MiM meets Brandon Sanderson plus the Suvudu Cage Match of the multiverse…

MiM met Brandon Sanderson at his book signing for The Gathering Storm..

Warbreaker is out in paperback, and Alcatraz Book 3 was awesome according to MiM Jr..the Wheel of Time collaborative work is a sad but satisfying read as we await the final two volumes of Memory of Light..

Check it out -Best thing I’ve read today (I can haz in gamer format please?!) from Brandon’s Amazon Blog –  Suvudu Cage Match:

So, from what I’ve heard, Rand won the Suvudu cage match.

This leaves me with mixed feelings. On one hand, I am pleased and proud. On the other hand, George R. R. Martin’s write-up of how he thought things would go was simply epic. In his version, the fight went as it should have in many ways, particularly near the end. Rand and Jamie, sword to sword, man to man. A win without a kill, respect given on both sides.

Robert Jordan is smiling somewhere, Mr. Martin.

If we take an infinite multiverse view of things (as is suggested in the Wheel of Time world) then what Mr. Martin wrote did indeed happen. And it didn’t. And everything in between happened as well.

However, in the version imagined by Brandon Sanderson, here’s how the fight goes down.

Mr. Martin’s narrative is more or less dead on until the end. Rand and Jamie struggle and fight, and it comes down to man against man. However, neither man can gain advantage over the other.

Then something flickers in Rand’s vision. Perhaps it’s a trick of the light. Perhaps it’s an assassin’s bolt, dipped in the poison of an asp and fired toward Rand in a moment of weakness. Perhaps it’s Rand’s madness asserting itself. Regardless of the cause, he thinks he’s being attacked by someone other than Jamie and his allies. Treachery, a violation of the trial of seven.

It may be real. It may not be.

Rand, in desperation, somehow forms weaves of power. Reckless weaves, fueled by anger, perhaps delusion (or perhaps when the One Power pool surrounding King’s Landing was used up, some started trickling in from surrounding areas through One Power drainage ditches and has just come close enough for Rand to tap). He creates a gateway through which to escape, but also lets loose a brilliant bolt of balefire, firing it at shadows moving on the other side of that gateway.

A column of liquid light springs forth, passes through the gateway, and hits Suvudu itself.

Now, it’s hard to say what effect this should have. Balefire, for those unaware, has the power to burn threads from the pattern and rework time itself. Kill someone with balefire, and things they did prior to being killed will be reversed.

Perhaps this should mean that the battle never happened. Perhaps it should wipe the entire experience from our minds. But balefire is an odd thing, as is a contest such as this one. And so, Rand’s actions remove the previous fights from existence, but don’t change what is happening between him and Jamie.

Through accident, Rand’s balefire brings back each and every fighter who participated in this tournament. Everyone appears on the battlefield at once.

Rand and Jamie stare in wonder at the chaos that follows.

Aragorn, Garet, and Hiro have a conversation about who is really the greatest swordsman in the world. It involves much stabbing, some pizza, and very little coding.

Kahlan exclaims that she was never part of a “fantasy” novel in the first place, and so disappears in a puff of hypocrisy.

Arthur Dent says, “Oh no, not again.”

Dumbledore tries to send Lyra on a quest to find some random magical object that is going to save the world, really, and is terribly important. So important that he can’t go himself. Honestly.

Roland ponders for twenty-two years before telling you what he does.

Harry Dresden decides this is really all too much work, and wanders off to get himself something to drink. He gets beaten up seventeen times on his way, but saves two orphanages.

Ender writes a poem about the Shrike, entitled “It Might Be a Demonic, Sadistic, Terrible Monster Made of Blades, Thorns, and Terror—but It’s Really Just Misunderstood.”

Kvothe flies in, riding Temeraire, Hermione at his side, and— (I’ve written the second two thirds of this sentence, but I’m not giving them to you yet.)

The Wee Free Men start chatting about this interesting fellow they met WHO SPEAKS IN ALL CAPS and wonders if this is all going to create a great big paradoxical mess he will have to fix.

Edward broods.

Ged, Vlad, and Conan give Eragon a wedgie.

Polgara throws something breakable at somebody, then goes to find Belgarath, who is most likely drinking with Mat, Tyrion, and Harry at this point.

Haplo and Raistlin get into an argument about how to pronounce Drizzt’s name.

Elric tries to decide just who among these people he likes the most, so that he can be forced to feed them to Stormbringer at a terribly dramatic moment, causing much personal angst.

Anita takes out Edward for good measure.

Gandalf and Aslan eye everyone mysteriously, then have a discussion over tea about whose resurrection was more meaningful.

Locke steals Gandalf’s staff and sells it on eBay as an authentic prop from the film trilogy. He then does the same thing with Hermione’s wand.

And at that point, the great Cthulhu himself awakens, and his terrible, alien nature drives everyone irrevocably insane.

Rand wins by default, since he was already insane, and Cthulhu showing up doesn’t really change him at all.

Ladies and gentlemen, we just got Cthulhu’d.

Best,

Brandon
More Blog Posts at Brandonsanderson.com
This is syndicated from Brandon Sanderson Blog.

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April 19, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Celebrities, English Literature, Entertainment, Fantasy, Fiction, Film, Horror, Mystery, Popular Culture, Sci Fi, Supernatural, Suspense, Urban Fantasy. Comments off.

Fantasy Master Michael Moorcock: Elric: The Stealer of Souls….

Free on Kindle,  As one fan notes, this cover is a sad comparison to the original Michael Whelan art, but it is a nice first volume collection of stories for those who may have misplaced their original paperbacks and are rebuilding their collection…ours are well worn and well loved and ready for our son to read….Click the image for an excerpt at the link…

elricstealerofsoulsFrom Amazon:

Product Description
“The stories here are the raw heart of Michael Moorcock. They are the spells that first drew me and all the numerous admirers of his work with whom I am acquainted into Moorcock’s luminous and captivating web.”
–from the Foreword by Alan Moore, creator of V for Vendetta

When Michael Moorcock began chronicling the adventures of the albino sorcerer Elric, last king of decadent Melniboné, and his sentient vampiric sword, Stormbringer, he set out to create a new kind of fantasy adventure, one that broke with tradition and reflected a more up-to-date sophistication of theme and style. The result was a bold and unique hero–weak in body, subtle in mind, dependent on drugs for the vitality to sustain himself–with great crimes behind him and a greater destiny ahead: a rock-and-roll antihero who would channel all the violent excesses of the sixties into one enduring archetype.

Now, with a major film in development, here is the first volume of a dazzling collection of stories containing the seminal appearances of Elric and lavishly illustrated by award-winning artist John Picacio–plus essays, letters, maps, and other material. Adventures include “The Dreaming City,” “While the Gods Laugh,” “Kings in Darkness,” “Dead God’s Homecoming,” “Black Sword’s Brothers,” and “Sad Giant’s Shield.”

An indispensable addition to any fantasy collection, Elric: The Stealer of Souls is an unmatched introduction to a brilliant writer and his most famous–or infamous–creation.

“The most significant UK author of sword and sorcery, a form he has both borrowed from and transformed.”
–The Encyclopedia of Fantasy

For the Whelan fans:michaelmoorecock vol1Amazon:

Amazon.com Review
Elric of Melniboné is a requisite title in the hard fantasy canon, a book no fantasy fan should leave unread. Author Michael Moorcock, already a major player in science fiction, cemented his position in the fantasy pantheon with the five-book Elric saga, of which Elric of Melniboné is the first installment. The book’s namesake, the brooding albino emperor of the dying nation of Melniboné, is a sort of Superman for Goths, truly an archetype of the genre. The youthful Elric is a cynical and melancholy king, heir to a nation whose 100,000-year rule of the world ended less than 500 years hence. More interested in brooding contemplation than holding the throne, Elric is a reluctant ruler, but he also realizes that no other worthy successor exists and the survival of his once-powerful, decadent nation depends on him alone. Elric’s nefarious, brutish cousin Yrkoon has no patience for his physically weak kinsman, and he plots constantly to seize Elric’s throne, usually over his dead body. Elric of Melniboné follows Yrkoon’s scheming, reaching its climax in a battle between Elric and Yrkoon with the demonic runeblades Stormbringer and Mournblade. In this battle, Elric gains control of the soul-stealing Stormbringer, an event that proves pivotal to the Elric saga. –Paul Hughes

Want to know the latest on the development of the film? Check out Michael’s fan board: Moorcock’s Miscellany

The original report of the pick up on the option, CNN by way of Variety:

The literary series began with 1972’s “Elric of Melnibone.” Universal’s option deal with production company Depth of Field covers 11 books — the original six installments of the series and five subsequent novels that touch on the saga.

The film adaptation, which will be produced but not written or directed by Depth of Field partners Chris and Paul Weitz, is conceived as a potential trilogy whose first installment will be culled from the series’ first six volumes. The producers plan to shop the book to writers and directors.

The novels are sensual and atmospheric sword-and-sorcery tales that center on Elric, a brooding albino warrior who presides over an unruly, decadent island nation. The novels follow Elric on a series of adventures, in which he is betrayed by his cousin, sent into exile and attempts to come to terms with his own humanity.

“We have loved this series since we were kids and can appreciate it even more as adults. It’s a sophisticated, literate, philosophically dense fantasy — a sort of ‘Matrix’ of the sword-and-sorcery genre,” Chris Weitz said.

Moorcock oversaw the sci-fi magazine New Worlds and helped usher in the “new wave” sci-fi movement of the 1960s and ’70s. He also performed in the British hard rock band Hawkwind and will co-produce the movie project.

If you are unfamiliar with Hawkwind, here is Pt 1 of the BBC4 Documentary, go to HawklordPXR5’s channel for the rest:

June 13, 2009. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , . Art, Entertainment, Fantasy, Fiction, Film, graphic art, Music, Popular Culture, Sci Fi. Comments off.

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